IPB Questionnaire

One of the things that has been most interesting to me about hockey blogging has been the conversation about what role bloggers can play in the sports dialog. I’m pretty frustrated with the angle that the main-stream media seems to insist on taking, which is that “good bloggers” will behave like journalists. I understand why the MSM is taking this approach, but I am truly puzzled as to why the blogosphere seems content to go along with it. In my opinion, the best blogs behave nothing like the media.

In response to the response to the Hockey Night in Canada piece on hockey bloggers, the gals over at IPB made this questionnaire.

I’m really glad to answer these questions, not because I think my answers are all that important in the great scheme of things, but because I think the IPB sisters are on to something with this “not everyone is the same” approach to blogging. I think that the plan is to create some sort of database of all these questionnaires, so at the very least, if you are a hockey blogger and you do this questionnaire, your technorati authority rating will increase by one after IPB links back to you. Isn’t that really what blogging is all about? :D

Sorry if this post is a little dry. It’s good for you. Like vegetables and sit-ups.

1. What was your motivation for starting blogging? Has that changed at all in the time you’ve been blogging?

For me (because I only started watching hockey a few months ago), hockey and blogging go hand in hand. I don’t know one without the other. Reading blogs contributed hugely to my very earliest development as a fan. Without a doubt, my interest in hockey grew as I delved deeper and deeper into the rich hockey blogosphere. I came to realize that because of my “newness” my take on hockey might be different and possibly interesting to readers. My motivation (beyond fame and fortune, obviously) was to share the experience of the first year of my hockey fandom in a funny way. Truthfully, I wanted a platform to attempt to be funny, and hockey is pretty funny to me.

2. What do you think your blog contributes to the hockey conversation?

Because I know very little about hockey, I often feel like I have no business penning a hockey blog. On the other hand, my inability to seriously analyze hockey has really freed me up to explore the more, um, whimsical aspects of my fandom. Because I don’t have the experience or the hockey knowledge to articulate what I am watching from an analytical standpoint, my posts end up reflecting a purely emotional response. Honestly, I think it’s the emotional response that makes sports blogging appealing as a reader.

I’m also probably a pretty good sample subject for studying the mythical “new hockey fan”.

3. What do you want to get out of the blogs you read?

I want to laugh, and I want to get a better idea of how other people relate to their team. My eyes just glaze over when things get too statbitty. I live in a community where hockey is covered pretty thoroughly by the MSM, so I seldom turn to blogs for information about the Sabres. I enjoy reading about what people are thinking and feeling about hockey.

4. What determines which blogs you read and which you don’t?

I think a personable tone and a healthy sense of humor are probably the things that attract me to some blogs more than others.

5. How important is the issue of gaining press access to you as a blogger?

Before I answer this, I would like to say that so far, unbelievably, neither the Sabres or the main-stream media has contacted me to offer me writing opportunities and unlimited player access. I know! It’s outrageous!

I would love to have some access to the team and the players, but not if that access means I’m expected to behave like a traditional journalist. I would never ever want to mask my fandom, which seems to be a requirement if you want to sit in the press box. So, I guess the answer is that I don’t care about press access at all. To be quite frank, I don’t see sports as a topic which requires traditional objectivity in very many circumstances. This isn’t politics we are talking about. It’s sports. The entire concept of sports is that we are fans. The illusion that anyone is devoid of team loyalty seems like a pretty shoddy platform in the first place, and perhaps this is why I prefer bloggers to journalists. At least bloggers are honest about where their emotional loyalties lie.

To take the glee/agony of being a fan out of the equation just so that I have the privilege of standing next to Bucky Gleason in the locker room?- meh. I’ll pass. (That said, if you’re reading this Toni, CALL ME! I’ll happily stand next to you in the locker room. Anytime.)

6. To what extent do you feel accountable for the content of your blog? How concerned do you think readers should be about the authority and accountability of your blog?

Well, I’m not in the business of breaking news on TWC, and at least 75% of what I write is pure fiction, so, the answer is yes, I feel hugely accountable for what appears on my blog. My approach may be goofy, but I do spend a significant amount of time on this stuff, and I’m proud of what I write. That said, my readers should probably be very concerned about the information they get on TWC. Heh.

7. How concerned are you about the authority and accountability of the blogs you read? Do you find it difficult to judge the authority and accountability of the blogs you read?

I actually think the blogosphere has created a pretty accurate system of checks and balances with how we link to one another. If someone is spouting lies, it doesn’t take long for the entire blogosphere to be up in arms. In a lot of ways, I approach blogs the way I probably should approach the main stream media, with a critical eye. Reading something, and then finding out later that that something is not true happens pretty much every single day, both online and in the papers. It’s a part of being alive and it’s not at all unique to blogging. (See: MainStreamMedia + Iraq War) I don’t sweat it too much. Certainly not when it comes to sports.

8. What value, if any, do you think blogging brings to the NHL?

My personal experience has proved to me that blogging can enrich the fan experience tremendously. It seems that not every hockey fan is as lucky as I am to live in a community chock full of hockey fans. Hockey blogging connects fans to one another, and increases interest in teams beyond our primary focus. Most importantly, blogging gives the fans an empowering voice, and creates a deeper connection to the the NHL product.

As a reward for getting through this unusually serious post, here’s a picture of Goose moving a puck into the net using only the power of his incredible mental focus:

You have to be careful around Goose. He can also read minds.

Advertisements

19 Responses to “IPB Questionnaire”


  1. 1 Schnookie December 4, 2007 at 9:52 am

    *clapclapclapclap* Katebits, that was beautiful! (Albeit a bit dry and overserious. You probably should have put that picture of Goose in the middle, as a little pick-me-up along the way.) I especially love your point about how it’s sports we’re talking about here, and bias is the whole point. Taking that idea a little further, I can’t help but think that the hysteria in the journalisty corner of the blogosphere about how we unprofessional, openly biased riffraff are tarnishing their reputations is ridiculous to start out with, but becomes even moreso when you take a second to remember that what they’re freaking out about is how people are comporting themselves as hockey fans.

  2. 2 Pookie December 4, 2007 at 9:57 am

    Reading something, and then finding out later that that something is not true happens pretty much every single day, both online and in the papers.

    I’m sorry, are you suggesting that we shouldn’t be running around crying that the sky is falling because people now have the ability to publish their thoughts online? Because, that’s what I’ve been doing for the last five years or so.

    Great, great answers, Katebits! The voice of the new fan is an integral one to the conversation, and invaluable one. Again, the NHL would do well to hear how and why you because such a rabid fan so quickly. They might be less inclined to believe that the sport is dying and in need of major changes. Aw, who am I kidding? We’re doomed!

  3. 3 Meg December 4, 2007 at 10:04 am

    To take the glee/agony of being a fan out of the equation just so that I have the privilege of standing next to Bucky Gleason in the locker room?- meh.

    I think that standing next to Bucky Gleason in a locker room would be high on my list of reasons not to gain press action. I’d make everyone uncomfortable by standing as far away as possible, frantically claiming that I didn’t want to get Bucky cooties.

    Seriously, though, I’m so glad you did start blogging and I think it’s great that you felt comfortable doing so as a new fan, because so many bloggers are so jaded and have that whole seen-it-all attitude. It’s refreshing–a palate cleanser. The Willful Caboose is totally the sorbet of the hockey blogosphere.

  4. 4 Mags December 4, 2007 at 12:11 pm

    Bravo Kate, bravo :D

  5. 5 Schnookie December 4, 2007 at 12:34 pm

    The Willful Caboose is totally the sorbet of the hockey blogosphere.

    Brilliantly put, Meg!

  6. 6 Pensgirl December 4, 2007 at 12:38 pm

    Because I don’t have the experience or the hockey knowledge to articulate what I am watching from an analytical standpoint, my posts end up reflecting a purely emotional response. Honestly, I think it’s the emotional response that makes sports blogging appealing as a reader.

    You’re exactly right about this. It seems like whether we exist in a corner of the world that loves hockey or we don’t, all of us are looking to blogs to provide us for a place where we can relate on an evisceral level. Journalism tells us that a fifth Flyer hit somebody in a suspension-worthy way; it does not reflect our utter outrage that this has been allowed to happen.

    I would love to have some access to the team and the players, but not if that access means I’m expected to behave like a traditional journalist. I would never ever want to mask my fandom, which seems to be a requirement if you want to sit in the press box. So, I guess the answer is that I don’t care about press access at all. To be quite frank, I don’t see sports as a topic which requires traditional objectivity in very many circumstances. This isn’t politics we are talking about. It’s sports. The entire concept of sports is that we are fans. The illusion that anyone is devoid of team loyalty seems like a pretty shoddy platform in the first place, and perhaps this is why I prefer bloggers to journalists. At least bloggers are honest about where their emotional loyalties lie.

    Again, right on. I don’t need for players to be scrutinized the way politicians should be. My dismay with newspapers is that there has been increased scrutiny of the things that don’t matter (sports; entertainment) and decreased scrutiny of the things that do (pretty much everything else).

    Besides which, nobody is unbiased, and hidden bias does nothing to serve me. The MSM likes to act as though bloggers are uncouth wearing their hearts on their sleeves. But the reality is I’m served better knowing exactly where someone is coming from. It helps me decide whether a blog is worth reading or not. We don’t have that same benefit when it comes to the MSM, where you might read someone for years before finding out he ignored so-and-so’s good play because that guy snubbed him for an interview in 2001.

  7. 7 Katebits December 4, 2007 at 5:11 pm

    Thanks to everyone who so thoughtfully replied! I was on an airplane all day, and it was fun to come home ad read what you all thought of this post.

    Meg, being called the sorbet of the hockey blogosphere might be the highest compliment anyone has ever paid me. :D Thank you!

  8. 8 Amy December 4, 2007 at 7:23 pm

    That said, my readers should probably be very concerned about the information they get on TWC.

    You mean Pommerdoodle’s girlfriend isn’t a squeaky toy!? I feel jipped!

    I’m really liking reading everyone’s opinions on the topic. Who would have thought that one little innocent blog comment would start such good dialogue both here and on IPB?

  9. 9 Katebits December 4, 2007 at 11:14 pm

    No, no, Amy. Pomerdoodle’s girlfriend is totally a squeaky toy. That part was totally true.

  10. 10 Patty (in Dallas) December 5, 2007 at 11:07 pm

    Great answers, Kate! Wasn’t it fun? I didn’t read anybody’s until I had mine written, but it’s interesting to see how much is still similar.

    We all like the funny ones, don’t we? :D

  11. 11 Moniboniz February 20, 2009 at 7:43 am

    Hi people… :)

  12. 12 anigiougNog August 13, 2009 at 3:05 pm

    This look interesting,so far.
    If there’s anyone else here, let me know.
    Oh, and yes I’m a real person LOL.

    Peace,

  13. 13 LoNet September 3, 2009 at 10:14 am

    Firm LoNet offers services in
    designing to installation, to adjustment of systems is
    security the fire alarm system, video observation, local and telephone сетей
    www.http://ess.na.by
    Наш сайт www.http://ess.na.by

  14. 16 zhuzhu January 10, 2011 at 4:34 pm

    Hello,

    Nice to be registered on willfulcaboose.wordpress.com. My little name is maxizhu ;-)

  15. 17 Imminurne September 20, 2011 at 10:09 pm

    Man .. Excellent .. Wonderful .. I will bookmark your website and take the feeds alsoI am happy to find so many useful info right here within the submit, we’d like develop more techniques in this regard, thank you for sharing. . . . . .


  1. 1 IPB Questionnaire Answers: Katebits Edition « Interchangeable Parts Trackback on December 4, 2007 at 9:47 am
  2. 2 BfloBlog.com » Blog Archive » Things I Missed While in Cleveland Trackback on December 5, 2007 at 1:20 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




…A Blog About the Buffalo Sabres

Observations 2
I can be reached at: willfulcaboose [at] gmail [dot] com

For All Your Facebook “Needs”

Categories

puck goggles
In accordance with the Fair Use Copyright Law, The Willful Caboose uses logos and registered trademarks of the National Hockey League to convey my criticism and inform the public of the Sabres' suckitude/badassitude (whatever the case may be). Photos on The Willful Caboose are used without permission, but do not interfere with said owner's profit. If you own a specific image on this site and want it removed, please e-mail me (willfulcaboose [at] gmail [dot] com) and I will be more than happy willing to oblige. (Special thanks to The Pensblog for their help with this disclaimer.)

Pages


%d bloggers like this: